A key Sept. 11 legacy: more domestic surveillance

In one of the biggest changes to American life since the 2001 terrorist attacks, the government now collects vast quantities of information about its citizens. By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times August 29, 2011, 7:14 p.m. Reporting from Washington— Internet entrepreneur Nicholas Merrill was working in his Manhattan office when an FBI agent in a trench coat arrived with an envelope. It was fall 2004, and federal investigators were using new legal authority they had acquired after Sept. 11, 2001. Merrill ran a small Internet service provider with clients including IKEA, Mitsubishi and freelance journalists. The agent handed Merrill a document called a National Security Letter, which demanded…[For full story:  http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/september11/la-na-911-homeland-security-surveillance-20110830,0,7272337.story

The rest is here:
A key Sept. 11 legacy: more domestic surveillance

Twitter Follow

Follow us on

Contact Us

ATTORNEY ADVERTISEMENT:  This communication or portions thereof may be considered "advertising" as defined by Section 6157(c) of the California Business and Professions Code or within the jurisdiction in which you are viewing this.  Nothing in the discussion above is intended to be a representation or guarantee about the outcome of any legal proceeding in which you may be involved.  By providing the information above in this format, Michel & Associates is not soliciting you to hire it to handle a specific legal matter you may currently have or be anticipating commencing in the future.  Notwithstanding the discussion above, you should not act or refrain from acting on the basis of any content on this site without seeking appropriate legal advice regarding your particular circumstances from an attorney licensed to practice law.  This communication is informational only and does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Michel & Associates.  Michel & Associates's attorneys are licensed to practice in California, Texas, and the District of Columbia.