NORML.ORG – Stimulation Of Marijuana Receptor Reduces Cocaine Consumption, Study Says

Baltimore, MD: The stimulation of a specific endocannabinoid receptor by a synthetic cannabinoid agonist significantly reduces the desire for cocaine , according to preclinical data published online in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience . Investigators at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Intramural Research Program reported that activation of the CB2 receptor via the administration of a selective cannabinoid agonist reduced intravenous cocaine administration in mice by up to 60 percent. Researchers concluded, “These findings suggest that brain CB2 receptors modulate cocaine’s rewarding and locomotor-stimulating effects, likely by a dopamine-dependent mechanism.” Separate studies have previously documented that THC is associated with reduced sensitivity to opiate dependence and that moderate cannabis use may improve retention to naltrexone treatment among opiate-dependent subjects. For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org . Full text of the study, “Brain cannabinoid CB2 receptors modulate cocaine’s actions in mice,” appears online in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

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NORML.ORG – Stimulation Of Marijuana Receptor Reduces Cocaine Consumption, Study Says