Supreme Court Denies Request to Hear Lawsuit by Victims of CIA Extraordinary Rendition Program

ACLU Says Government Improperly Using “State Secrets” Privilege to Avoid Judicial Review NEW YORK – The U.S. Supreme Court today announced it would not hear a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of five men who were kidnapped by the CIA, sent to U.S.-run prisons overseas and tortured as part of the Bush administration’s “extraordinary rendition” program. The ACLU and the ACLU of Northern California sued Boeing subsidiary Jeppesen Dataplan in May 2007, charging that the company knowingly provided direct logistical support to the aircraft and crews used by the CIA for the program. Although the federal government was not named in the lawsuit, it intervened for the sole purpose of claiming that the case should be dismissed on the basis of the “state secrets” privilege, an argument that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit accepted by a 6 to 5 vote in September 2010.

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