To Prevent False IDs, Police Lineups Get Revamped

National Public Radio – by ALIX SPIEGEL [See link at the bottom for an audio of the story interview ] In a small room at police headquarters in Dallas, a police officer and the eyewitness to a minor crime recently sat down together to consider six photographs in a photo lineup. Eyewitness identifications like this happen every day in America, and on the surface, it is a straightforward transaction. The witness looks at the pictures. The witness picks a person from the photos. Or the witness doesn’t. But for decades, psychological scientists have worried that the traditional way police departments have conducted these photo lineups was flawed and was landing many innocent people in jail. There was a better way, they argued, and police departments needed to change. [Full Story: http://www.npr.org/2011/07/06/137652142/to-prevent-false-ids-police-lineups-get-revamped ]

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To Prevent False IDs, Police Lineups Get Revamped

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